Trench Digging Shovel

Click small images to enlarge

 

HISCO trench digging shovel with long handle

Trench Digging Shovel

  4.6 / 5.0   14 Ratings

$46.95
 Add to Cart  
In stock, ready to ship.

Made in the USA for the construction & trenching industry.


Trenching Shovel Details

● Professional Grade
● Overall Length = 59"
● Blade Width = 3-3/4"
● Handle Angle = 30°
● Weight = 4.5 pounds
● 14 gauge steel head
● Reinforced metal collar
● Fiberglass handle *details
● HISCO HIST4-4

This shovel will last a long, long time. You can safely do a little prying with it to get out those roots and rocks (just don't go crazy, that is what pry bars are for). You can leave it in the back of your truck all year, and it will not rot like a wooden handled shovel. The kind of use and abuse that will destroy inexpensive wooden hardware store shovels will barely scratch this tool.

FREE SHIPPING on orders over $60.00 to continental USA. If under $60, shipping is $10.00

> Click to learn about Uses of Trench Digging Shovel

Customer Reviews of the Trenching Shovel

"This is the third time I have ordered from Easy Digging and I have been very pleased every time. Excellent quality tools that have made a big difference in helping me improve drainage in my horse pastures and survive Maine's crazy mud season!"

Nick, from ME  

"Very reliable company; flexible and willing to accommodate and customize itself to fit the needs of this customer. I was very pleased with my interaction. Godspeed all you diggers!"

Ryan, in PA  

"No problems at all. The item I ordered was on back order from the manufacturer and I was promptly notified by Easy Digging and given an expected ship date. Great customer services, I'd say. I just placed another order with them."

Will, from GA  

"A great tool! Made my job much easier as I trenched over 100 feet. "

Anonymous, in NY  

See more Reviews

 

What are Trench Shovels used for?

There are two types of trenching tools: one for actually digging into the soil, and the other for removing the loose soil from the bottom of a trench that was cut with a powered trencher.

The type used just for removing loose soil from a cut trench, is called a Clean-Out Shovel or a Bottom Digger, and these are explained and sold on those linked pages.

The type used for actually digging is called a Trenching Digging Shovel. It is used for digging narrow flat-bottomed trenches. This type is also called a step-trench shovel. It is a hand trenching tool that is commonly used for digging up to 18" deep. Though it lacks the boxed sides of a clean-out shovel, it can be used occasionally for removing loose soil from the bottom of a trench.

For shallow trenches that do NOT need to be flat-bottomed (like for lighting or sprinkler lines) our Sharp Shooter shovel (drain spade) is usually used.

Benefits of Fiberglass Handles...

HISCO fiberglass handle construction diagram

● Greater strength pound for pound than steel.
● They are very difficult to damage.
● Resists impact, and is non-denting.
● Will not absorb moisture or warp.
● Will not conduct electricity.

HISCO's fiberglass handles have a legacy of premium performance. All HISCO handles are produced from thousands of continuous strands of fiberglass saturated with resins, and have a smooth polyester veil (coating) on the surface. The veil gives the handle a smooth comfortable finish and keeps the fiberglass from splintering or scratching. The D-Grips, used on short handled tools, are made of one-piece high-density nylon.

The long handled digging shovels feature the 8-inch Tuffoam double-dip grips which have been designed for the toughest industrial applications. The grips have a durable, vinyl inner liner and a comfortable, non-slip foam exterior that provides long life and helps prevent potential harmful hand fatigue.


Is it hard to dig with this shovel?

Honestly, yeah it is a bit difficult. What makes it hard is that the shovel is narrow (you can only press down with the toe of your boot), and you can't move around and dig from all sides like when digging a round hole. But sometimes you need to trench somewhere a power trencher does not fit, or just finish up the ends of a trench where the power trencher stopped. The other advantage of using a narrow shovel is that is means less soil lifted, and less ground disturbed. Why dig a 10" wide trench when you really only need a 4" one?

 

Connect with us!