Jab Planter

Stand and Plant your garden seeds

Jab Planter - full view seed cup mounted to a jab planter Stand-N-Plant seeder Easy Digging Tools
Overall: 4.87/5 30 ratings
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Jab Planter

$86.00

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Fast and easy to use. 36" tall. Steel construction. Includes planter, seed holder, spacing gage, and a fabric seed belt pouch.

Quickly plant garden seeds. No stress, no pain...

Quickly plant garden seeds. No stress, no pain.

Quickly plant garden seeds. No stress, no pain...

  • Strong steel construction
  • Minimal soil preparation needed
  • All seeds up to 1/2" round
  • Planting depth adjustable up to 3"
  • Easily adjustable spacing gage
  • Made in the USA

Patented hand seeder design has a retractable solid rod inside the straight tube to keep soil from plugging the tube.

The planter is just pressed into the ground, then the solid rod (with the ball on top) is lifted a short distance, and a seed is dropped down the bent tube.

How to use the Jab Planter (or stab seeder)

 

If you are familiar with gardening tools, then you can think of this jab seeder as a Dibber (or dibble) combined with a seed guide tube. A dibber is solid tool that is pushed into the soil to create a small hole for a seed. The straight steel tube of this stab planter encloses a wooden rod with a ball handle on the top and a steel tip on the bottom. This tube and rod combine to make a 3 foot tall dibble.

For larger seeds (like corn) the end of the planter is pushed into the soil until the adjustable depth stop reaches the ground. Then the rod is raised (the planter stays in place) to open a path for a seed to be dropped through the bent tube down to the bottom of the hole. Then the rod is lowered and the whole planter is lifted and moved forward. The adjustable spacing gage is visually lined up with the last hole, and then you push down on the ball to create the next seed hole.

For tiny seeds that are planted very shallow and close together (like carrots): Create a shallow furrow the length of your row. Remove the rod and the depth stop from the seeder. Put the tip of the seeder in the furrow and tip the planter towards you. Drop seeds down the straight tube as you keep dragging the seeder along the row. Afterwords, lightly cover the seeds with loose soil.

How to use the Jab Planter (or stab seeder)

 

 

If you are familiar with gardening tools, then you can think of this jab seeder as a Dibbler combined with a seed guide tube. A dibbler is solid tool that is pushed into the soil to create a small hole for a seed. The straight steel tube of this stab planter encloses a wooden rod with a ball handle on the top and a steel tip on the bottom. This tube and rod combine to make a 3 foot tall dibbler.

For larger seeds (like corn) the end of the planter is pushed into the soil until the adjustable depth stop reaches the ground. Then the rod is raised (the planter stays in place) to open a path for a seed to be dropped through the bent tube down to the bottom of the hole. Then the rod is lowered and the whole planter is lifted and moved forward. The adjustable spacing gage is visually lined up with the last hole, and then you push down on the ball to create the next seed hole.

For tiny seeds that are planted very shallow and close together (like carrots): Create a shallow furrow the length of your row. Remove the rod from the jab seeder. Put the tip of the seeder in the furrow and tip the planter towards you. Drop seeds down the straight tube as you keep dragging the seeder along the row. Afterwords, lightly cover the seeds with loose soil.

solid rod that fits inside the jab seeder dibbler end of the stab planter top and seed cup of stand and plant seeder spacing gage for the jab planter
Customer Testimonials

It is clear this merchant has customer satisfaction as his highest priority. The tools he sells are a joy to use.
Erik in Colorado

good tools, will buy again when needed. We garden, raise chickens and pigs, and do some experimental permaculture. Small scale stuff and we do as much as we can by hand for reasons of economy and sustainability. EasyDigging tools make life easier, but it still feels like work to my 70 year old body. Ask me again when I'm 80 . . .
in Indiana

Page last modified on 2017-10-31

 

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